Products

Cambistat® A soil-applied plant growth regulator that reduces tree growth and provides therapy for trees in stressful sites. A single application provides these benefits for multiple years depending on use and location.

Untreated

Cambistat Treated

Bacastat™ Tree Injection is a unique water soluble oxytetracycline formulation that is used for injection into non-crop bearing ornamental trees such as oak, elm, sycamore, and palm for suppression of bacterial diseases. Bacastat is tree friendly, as it contains no solvents.
Bacastat

Bacastat

Anthracnose

Anthracnose

Anthracnose is not a specific fungal disease, but rather a term that describes similar symptoms on the leaves of trees that are caused by many different fungal organisms.

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Apple Scab

Apple Scab

Apple Scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is not considered a serious threat to crabapple or apple trees; however, repeated annual infections can weaken the tree making it more susceptible to other insect or disease problems.

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Bacterial Leaf Scortch

Bacterial Leaf Scortch

Bacterial Leaf Scorch (BLS) is a devastating disease of shade trees that is caused by the xylem-inhabiting bacteria Xylella fastidiosa. Leaf desiccation is the most prominent visible symptom, although infected trees
may eventually display dieback, branch death, and prematurely die. Commonly infected trees include oaks, elms, sycamores, and sweetgum, making this an important disease for arborists to manage.
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Bagworms

Bagworms

What are Bagworms?Native to the United States, the bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) is a defoliating caterpillar related to moths and butterflies that commonly feeds on the foliage of many coniferous and deciduous trees east of the Rocky Mountains. The bagworm’s self spun bag, which can be found hanging from the host plant by mid-summer is unsightly. Excessive feeding can strip away large quantities of leaves, causing branch dieback, and dead patches on the host plant.
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Brown Birch Borer

Brown Birch Borer

Bronze Birch Borer (BBB) Native to North America, damage caused by the BBB dates back to the late 1800’s and continues to present day. This pest is known to attack all native and non-native species of birch, although susceptibility varies. The BBB is opportunistic and thrives in birch trees that are weakened or stressed by agents such as drought, soil compaction, root injury, other insects, and old age. Birch trees tend to prefer cool and moist growing sites, which are not typically found in most residential and urban areas. With frequent stress caused by dehydration, high temperatures, and compacted soils, landscape birch trees are commonly attacked by this pest.
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Chlorosis

Chlorosis

What is Chlorosis? Chlorosis is a serious condition where a tree’s ability to manufacture chlorophyll has been compromised. Because chlorophyll is the green pigment found in leaves, this condition is easy to diagnose by looking at leaf color. Mild chlorosis may occur as a pale green appearance to the leaves, while leaves may be yellow and even white in severe cases.
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Drought Stress

Drought Stress

Why Urban Trees are Drought StressedLess Water is Available – Unless regularly irrigated, urban trees generally have less water available than their counterparts in natural settings. Why? Paved surfaces encourage runoff instead of absorption, and these surfaces cause higher soil temperatures and faster evaporation of rainfall.
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Dutch Elm Disease

Dutch Elm Disease

What is the Cause of Dutch Elm Disease? Dutch elm disease is caused by an aggressive fungus (Ophiostoma novo-ulmi) that kills elms regardless of their health. It is considered the most costly shade tree disease ever and will remain active in a community as long as there are susceptible trees. The fungus invades the water transporting vessels and produces toxins to which the tree reacts. In defense to the toxins the tree produces gums and internal growths designed to block the advance of the fungus. The combination of the toxins and the defense mechanisms of the tree inhibit water flow to the crown, which causes wilting and tree death.
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Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) EAB is an invasive pest from Asia and threatens the ash tree population in the United States. In Michigan alone it has killed over 20 million trees since its discovery in 2002. Through a combination of natural spread and human activity it is now found in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Maryland, placing millions of additional ash trees at risk. It will continue to spread and is probably a permanent member of our insect population.
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Gypsy Moth

Gypsy Moth

Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) is one of the most significant exotic pests in the history of the United States. Introduced to Boston in the 1860s, it has continued to spread throughout the eastern United States. The gypsy moth larvae defoliate trees leaving them weakened and vulnerable to secondary fungal and insect invaders. Repeated defoliation of hardwoods can kill the tree directly and a single defoliation may cause severe dieback and decline on softwood species, like pine and spruce, especially when coupled with drought or other abiotic stress.
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Improving Root Systems

Improving Root Systems

Healthy Soil Means Healthy Roots Over 50% of a tree’s living tissue is found below the ground. The active roots, those providing the vast majority of a tree’s water and nutrients, are located primarily in the top 6” of soil. Factors such as construction damage, soil compaction, competition from turf grass, and other human activities can greatly impact the health of roots as well as the health of the soil itself. Biological activity in the soil is responsible for the nutrients available to trees through the processes of the soil food web.
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Injured Roots

Injured Roots

Roots Are Shallow Most trees grow shallow absorptive roots that are located in the top 12” of soil. This makes urban trees very vulnerable to a host of problems that can injure their root system. Root injury is often overlooked as the cause of decline and death of many trees. Some common causes of damage to the root system include soil compaction, root cutting, drainage problems, and drought.
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Japanese Beetles

Japanese Beetles

What are Japanese Beetles? Native to Japan, the Japanese beetle (Popilia japonica) was first detected in New Jersey in about 1916. It has since spread to nearly every state east of the Mississippi, and continues to spread each year. The adult beetles are skeletonizers, which means they feed on the leaves of trees by eating the tissue between the leaf veins. Severe Japanese beetle infestations can completely devour all of the tree’s leaf tissue, leaving only the veins behind. They will often feed on flowers and fruit as well.
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Laurel Wilt

Laurel Wilt

Laurel Wilt is a deadly vascular wilt disease of red bay (Persea borbonia) and other trees in the Lauraceae family, caused by a fungus (Raffaelea lauricola). The fungus is carried by a recently-introduced ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus) that is native to Asia (India, Japan, and Taiwan).
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Oak Wilt

Oak Wilt

What Causes Oak Wilt? Oak wilt is a lethal disease caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum. The fungus invades and disables the water-conducting system in white, red and other oak species. Different species of oaks vary in susceptibility to the disease. Red oaks typically die within 4 to 6 weeks of initial symptom development, while white oaks may survive or take 1 to 6 months to defoliate and die.
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Pine Wilt

Pine Wilt

Pine Wilt is a fatal disease of pine (Pinus spp.) caused by the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Nematodes are microscopic, worm-like organisms that grow inside the tree’s water conducting tissue causing a rapid death of infected trees. As a native to North America the pine wilt nematode is primarily a pathogen of non-native, 2-3 needle pines. The disease is transfered from infected trees to healthy trees by pine sawyer beetles (Monochamus spp.) as they feed on the bark and foliage of susceptible pines.
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Proper Root Depth

Proper Root Depth

What is Proper Root Depth? Over 50% of a tree’s living tissue is found below the ground. The active roots, those providing the vast majority of a tree’s water and nutrients, are located primarily in the top 6” of soil. If soil is added around the root zone of an established tree these roots can become too deep and will begin to affect the health of the tree. Some tree species can tolerate some amount of soil added over their roots, others are more sensitive and cannot. Improper root depth is a common problem for trees in urban environments.
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Reduce Tree Growth

Reduce Tree Growth

Slowing Growth for a Healthier Tree Large trees add beauty, character, and value to the landscape, and they are highly desired by many homeowners. While it is appealing to think most trees in the landscape will eventually grow large
and provide these benefits, this may not always be in the best interest of your tree and property.
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Two-Lined Chestnut Borer

Two-Lined Chestnut Borer

Two-Lined Chestnut Borer (TLCB) is an opportunistic insect pest that attacks a variety of species. It was given the name “chestnut” borer in recognition of its status as a primary pest of the American chestnut tree. The chestnut has been almost completely wiped out by a fungal disease, yet the insect has retained its name to this day even though there are few chestnut trees for it to attack. A pair of faint white to golden colored lines on the main body and wings of adults are useful identifiers.
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Urban Tree Stress

Urban Tree Stress

Why urban trees are stressed Trees growing in urban areas and yards typically live much shorter lives than trees growing in natural settings. Some research shows trees only live to be about 10 years old in very difficult downtown settings. What makes urban sites and yards such stressful places for trees to grow?
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